More on female sex tourism – Historical discussion

[This entry was initially posted to the original Red Keyhole blog on 10 March 2011.]

In the posting More on female sex tourism – What it is, where it is, and some typical lingo, this blog presented informational material on female sex tourism excerpted from an entry in Wikipedia, which explained that

Female sex tourism is travel by women, partially or fully for the purpose of having sex. The practice differs from male sex tourism in that women do not typically use the structures of the sex industry (e.g. strip clubs, sex shows and organised tours) to meet foreign partners.

In this post, Red Keyhole continues its dissemination of informational material on this intriguing subject, a form of female sexual activity that (as this blog has previously noted) typically involves women traveling abroad for recreational sex, often interracial sex with black gigolos, and has, in recent decades, been “energized particularly by more liberalized cultural attitudes on women’s rights and sexuality, plus the recognition by more women of their own sexual needs, interests, and desires.” (See Female “Sex Tourism” — Women seeking hot, casual, interracial sex in Third World vacation getaways.)


In recent decades, liberated sexuality has allowed many women (mainly from advanced industrialized countries) to travel to Third World resorts for sexual recreation with local gigolos.

The Wikipedia article provides the following useful history of this sexual behavior:

Barring some isolated cases of women traveling for sex among North American Indian tribes, female travel sex (involving American and English women) began in Rome in the late 1840s, at the same time as first wave feminism, which encouraged independence and travel.

Affairs and intrigues, particularly between American heiresses and impoverished European aristocrats, continued steadily until World War I, inspiring a whole genre of literature such as Henry James’s Daisy Miller, Joaquin Miller’s The One Fair Woman, and much of the early output of E.M. Forster.

Female sex travel declined from the time of the Depression until the 1960s.

Today, many other destinations are popular, including Egypt, Morocco, Nepal, Thailand, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Mexico — everywhere with beaches (or in Nepal’s case, mountains) and a surplus of underemployed men.

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
17 February 2011
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Female_sex_tourism